Introducing The Nike EXP-X14

Nike Sportswear has just introduced a new silhouette with the arrival of the Nike EXP-X14.

The Nike Sportswear EXP-X14 both remembers Nike’s history and pushes the boundaries of lifestyle footwear through the use of numbers and transparent design elements. Here’s what you need to know about it.

The name and numbers

  • EXP is shorthand for “experiment,” which was essentially how the Nike Sportswear designers adapted performance running features into a lifestyle shoe.
  • The second part of the shoe’s name, X14, was the original internal codename for Nike React technology (which is used in the shoe’s midsole to provide cushion for all-day comfort).
  • N3546, which is printed on the medial side, represents Steve Prefontaine’s fastest mile (3 minutes and 54.6 seconds) and nods to Nike’s rich history in running.

Its look

  • With its translucent upper, this shoe is a modern take on the Nike Zoom Drive (a late-90s running shoe).
  • The exposed TPU plate that cuts across the midsole and tapered heel emulate the Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4% shoes worn by Breaking2 athletes.

The Nike Sportswear EXP-X14 will be available beginning June 28 via SNEAKRS in Europe. From July 5, the shoe will be available from the Nike SNKRS app in North America, Greater China on nike.com and at select retailers. Continue reading

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Dark Dream Characters in the Paintings of Bill Mayer

Bill Mayer is a well-known artist currently based in Decatur, Georgia, whose curious creatures have been widely featured on magazines, ads, stamps, posters, and more. Since an early age, Mayer has been attracted to things that are strange; this leaning towards oddity is evident in the selection of gouache paintings shown here, which include anthropomorphic…


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Celebration Of Mexico’s World Cup Goal Against Germany Caused Detectable Seismic Activity In Mexico City

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Two sensitive pieces of seismic equipment located in Mexico City were able to detect an “artificial earthquake” caused by fans going nuts and jumping around following Hirving Lozano’s goal for Mexico in the 34th minute of their World Cup match against Germany. I remember getting drunk and watching that game! “Nobody cares, GW.” My neighbors did.

The event wasn’t big enough to be measured in magnitudes and wouldn’t have been perceptible to the general population, according to the Institute for Geological and Atmospherical Investigations, which is not a government agency. Continue reading

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